Kill the Mall and Other Strange Phenomena

There are very few books that have me shook after reading, and although I wouldn’t classify this one as ground-breaking, I definitely felt mildly shook and confused after finishing Kill the Mall by Pasha Malla. The narrator is offered a residency at a strip mall, offering up days and nights to observe the goings-on to…

Neuroscience and Brain Things

The first on my list was The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons by Sam Kean, an introduction to neuroscience using brilliant storytelling.

The Four Winds: The Dust Bowl, the Great Depression, and 2020

The Four Winds by Kristin Hannah doesn’t actually take place in 2020, but the marvel that is this book sure resonates on an entirely new level after all the events of last year and so far from this year. The novel follows Elsa Martinelli’s journey from childhood during the Prohibition to her family in northern…

Three Adventures, One Wild Ride*

Raft of Stars by Andrew J. Graff grabbed me from the first page and kept me along for the ride. In this debut novel, two best friends run from a prison sentence; Fischer Branson attempts to save his best friend, Dale Breadwin, by shooting Dale’s father. They run to the woods to escape retribution and…

Axiom’s End, an Incredible Debut by Lindsay Ellis*

In the ever-growing search to discover my new favorite book, I downloaded this book from Libro.fm, the Audible alternative that directly supports independent booksellers. (Not only do I obsessively send people to Libro to support local bookstores, but I actively try to get listeners to change.) After finding new books to listen to, I discovered…

“White Fragility” and Why It’s Your Next Book*

Robin DeAngilo, a white, middle-class woman, writes about her experience consulting, educating, and facilitating discussions on race and social justice. As an expert that visits various workplaces and organizations, her role is to enter a group, discover the racial problem in its midst, and deescalate the experience into one of understanding and growth for every…

Why Slavery’s Reach is the Book I Needed Most*

Let’s check the receipts. Following slaveholder money and power in Minnesota, Slavery’s Reach: Southern Slaveholders in the North Star State by Christopher P. Lehman generates an image of pro-slavery Minnesota before and during the Civil War. Businesses ran by slaveholders and unfree workers went up and down the Mississippi river, granting freedom to slaves that…

Mighty Be Our Powers by Lehmah Gbowee (2011)*

Following the rise of violence and war in Liberia during the early years of the First Liberian Civil War, Lehmah Gbowee flees to escape her hometown. Juggling children, abusive partners, patriarchal politicians, and short bouts of alcohol abuse, Gbowee shows us that power comes from within. She leads organizations in peaceful protest against the corrupt…